Udawalawe_edited
Udawalawe National Park

The national park was created to provide a sanctuary for wild animals displaced by the construction of the Udawalawe Reservoir on the Walawe River, as well as to protect the catchment of the reservoir. The reserve covers 30,821 hectares (119.00 sq mi) of land area and was established on 30 June 1972. Before the designation of the national park, the area was used for shifting cultivation (chena farming). The farmers were gradually removed once the national park was declared. The park is 165 kilometres (103 mi) from Colombo. Udawalawe is an important habitat for water birds and Sri Lankan elephants. It is a popular tourist destination and the third most visited park in the country.

Udawalawe lies on the boundary of Sri Lanka's wet and dry zones. Plains dominate the topography, though there are also some mountainous areas. The Kalthota Range and Diyawini Falls are in the north of the park and theoutcrops of Bambaragala and Reminikotha lie within it. The park has an annual rainfall of 1,500 millimetres (59 in), most of which falls during the months of October to January and March to May. The average annual temperature is about 27–28 °C (81–82 °F), while relative humidity varies from 70% to 82%. Well-drained reddish-brown soil is the predominant soil type, with poorly drained low humic grey soils found in the valley bottoms. Mainly alluvial soils form the beds of the water cources

things to do

Gem Mining in Sri Lanka
Gem Mining in Sri Lanka

Gemstone mining in Sri Lanka is mostly from secondary deposits. The gravels yield sapphire, ruby, cat's-eye and other chrysoberyls, spinel, garnet, beryl, tourmaline, topaz, quartz, and many other gemstones. Sri Lanka's gem-bearing gravels, called illam, are some of the richest in the world.

Udawalawe Dam
Udawalawe Dam

The Udawalawe Dam is a large irrigation dam in Udawalawe, in the Southern Province of Sri Lanka. The dam consists of an embankment section and a gravity section, combining the total dam length to approximately 3.9 km (2.4 mi). The dam is also used for hydroelectric power generation, powering a single 6 MW unit, commissioned in April 1969.

Gem Mining in Sri Lanka
Gem Mining in Sri Lanka

Gemstone mining in Sri Lanka is mostly from secondary deposits. The gravels yield sapphire, ruby, cat's-eye and other chrysoberyls, spinel, garnet, beryl, tourmaline, topaz, quartz, and many other gemstones. Sri Lanka's gem-bearing gravels, called illam, are some of the richest in the world.

1/2